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The School Sucks PodClass: Education Evolution
Indoctrination + Regurgitation + Graduation ≠ An Education
Category: Education
Location: Newmarket, New Hampshire
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My name is Brett and I have worked in education for the last ten years, in a variety of capacities. I am currently the Vice Pre...


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July 01, 2015 09:16 PM PDT
With Wes Bertrand and Matt Amberson Discussed Today: -If there is a Liberty Movement, is it moving? Why not? -NVC and trauma: Rosenberg’s disconnection (and lack of philosophical clarity) -recent ”mind control” and “manipulation” claims -the trauma cycle: shame, dishonesty (with self and others), more shame, inauthenticity, defense and disconnection -how to heal, the 7th Pillar of Self-Esteem 6 PSYCHOLOGICAL WOUNDS (from unmet needs): 1-formation of a false-self (in order to survive) 2-excessive shame 3-excessive guilt 4-excessive fears 5-reality distortion (like denial) 6-problems with trust (trusting too easily and being or not trusting trustworthy people and being isolated) 7-difficulty feeling your emotions; being numb—and/or difficulty bonding with others and tolerating healthy intimacy REQUISITES FOR RECOVERY: -awareness… -knowledge… -recruit inner strength -focusing on many inner resources -motivation (speaks to hitting bottom, not trial bottom or pseudo-recovery)—usually between 35-45yo -need to be in a pro-recovery environment, a functional setting with advocates of healing and growth -IFS (or inner-family therapy)…work with subselves involved in and causing wounds and have them integrate with true-self BENEFITS OF RECOVERY as you free your true-self to make more life decisions: -more serenity and less stress, yielding happiness -increase in self-confidence and decrease in self-doubt -confusion decreases, and clear vision increases -decrease in impulsive behavior, and increase in thoughtful, intentional actions -noticeably improved self-care (including emotional) -frequency and duration of depressive episodes reduce and feel “good enough,” centered, grounded, resourceful, and joyful -sleep better (fewer wake-ups, mind racing, bad dreams) -excessive guilt and shame shrink, replaced by self-grounded, clear, serene, etc. -increasing clarity on life purpose -communicate more effectively, healthy self-assertiveness -general quality of relationships in your life will increase as a theme, less fighting, stress, anxiety and more win/win problem solving -hope for a better life goes up, way up Look Closer: Complete Liberty Inside Out: Honoring Yourself and Others for Optimal Enrichment - http://amzn.to/1B1CdFo Wes: CompleteLiberty.com/ - http://completeliberty.com/ Complete Liberty Series on trauma - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-209---the-nature-of-trauma-and-nonviolent-change-and-self-compassion_296.html Matt: DeadEasyLife.com - http://deadeasylife.com/ Linking childhood trauma to long-term health and social consequences: What is The ACE Study? - http://www.acestudy.org/ AcesTooHigh.com/ - http://acestoohigh.com/ Happiness Counseling Resources - http://happinesscounseling.com/happiness-resources/ CLP Episode 212 - Adverse Childhood Experiences and reflections on therapeutic solutions - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-212---adverse-childhood-experiences-and-reflections-on-therapeutic-solutions_299.html The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma - http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938 Peter Gerlack on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCegNhGTqlWjgOqaCsj_7pxw

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June 24, 2015 07:09 AM PDT

A very loose conversation about childhood fantasy, lepofuology, baseball, super powers, movies, video games and the creative process.

Davi's Site: DaviBarker.com
Shire Dude's Site: ShireDude.com/

June 19, 2015 05:44 AM PDT
With Wes Bertrand and Matt Amberson Discussed Today:

Review

-This study is a great way to introduce the importance of childhood experiences to our lives. -ACE shows clearly that what happens affects our later years. -Childhood treatment is important to the health of the individual. -Two thirds of us have some ACE but all of us are subject to counterproductive childhood experiences. -What affects us is what was done to us but also what wasn't done. -We need touch, play, nurturing to thrive. -These affect us in a continuum from addiction to smaller irrational behaviors. -ACE is great to show the correlation but there is a whole lot more on the continuum. -ASK because we ACT. -Bias to sickness, abuse will affect our lives unless we do something about it. -Understanding our childhood is important to understanding ourselves, our relationships, community, society, history and our future. -Relationships friends, mate, children how we are triggered and subconsciously communicate trauma.

Common Psychological Wounds (Gerlach)

Growing up in a low-nurturance childhood seems to promote two or more of these: 1) A disabled true Self, which causes a mix of... 2) Excessive shame and guilt, and... 3) Excessive fears, and ... 4) Significant reality distortions, and... 5) Excessive trust or distrust 6) Difficulty feeling, empathizing, and bonding (attaching to / caring about / loving) other living things.

Other Topics

-Neuroscience and mindfulness -self-integration: a critical thinking approach to the emotions -comedy can help reprocess trauma Look Closer: Complete Liberty Inside Out: Honoring Yourself and Others for Optimal Enrichment - http://amzn.to/1B1CdFo Wes: CompleteLiberty.com/ - http://completeliberty.com/ Complete Liberty Series on trauma - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-209---the-nature-of-trauma-and-nonviolent-change-and-self-compassion_296.html Matt: DeadEasyLife.com - http://deadeasylife.com/ Linking childhood trauma to long-term health and social consequences: What is The ACE Study? - http://www.acestudy.org/ AcesTooHigh.com/ - http://acestoohigh.com/ Happiness Counseling Resources - http://happinesscounseling.com/happiness-resources/ CLP Episode 212 - Adverse Childhood Experiences and reflections on therapeutic solutions - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-212---adverse-childhood-experiences-and-reflections-on-therapeutic-solutions_299.html The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma - http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938 Peter Gerlack on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCegNhGTqlWjgOqaCsj_7pxw

Please Support School Sucks

Our Amazon Wish List Donate With Bitcoin Or Join the A/V Club Your continued support keeps the show going and growing, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering this message. This subscription also grants you access to the A/V Club, a bonus content section with 200+ hours of exclusive audio and video. If you are a regular consumer of our media, please consider making a monthly commitment by selecting the best option for you...
Join the A/V Club! $6.00/Month
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June 16, 2015 09:42 AM PDT
With Wes Bertrand and Matt Amberson Discussed Today: -Monologue: Avoiding a victim mentality and promoting the Six Pillars of Self-Esteem -We continue going through the ACES questions and scoring ourselves, while discussing our answers and experiences. THE QUESTIONS 5. Did you often or very often feel that ... You didn’t have enough to eat, had to wear dirty clothes, and had no one to protect you? or Your parents were too drunk or high to take care of you or take you to the doctor if you needed it? 6. Were your parents ever separated or divorced? 7. Was your mother or stepmother: Often or very often pushed, grabbed, slapped, or had something thrown at her? or Sometimes, often, or very often kicked, bitten, hit with a fist, or hit with something hard? or Ever repeatedly hit at least a few minutes or threatened with a gun or knife? 8. Did you live with anyone who was a problem drinker or alcoholic or who used street drugs? 9. Was a household member depressed or mentally ill, or did a household member attempt suicide? 10. Did a household member go to prison? Look Closer: Complete Liberty Inside Out: Honoring Yourself and Others for Optimal Enrichment - http://amzn.to/1B1CdFo Wes: CompleteLiberty.com/ - http://completeliberty.com/ Complete Liberty Series on trauma - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-209---the-nature-of-trauma-and-nonviolent-change-and-self-compassion_296.html Matt: DeadEasyLife.com - http://deadeasylife.com/ Linking childhood trauma to long-term health and social consequences: What is The ACE Study? - http://www.acestudy.org/ AcesTooHigh.com/ - http://acestoohigh.com/ Happiness Counseling Resources - http://happinesscounseling.com/happiness-resources/ CLP Episode 212 - Adverse Childhood Experiences and reflections on therapeutic solutions - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-212---adverse-childhood-experiences-and-reflections-on-therapeutic-solutions_299.html The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma - http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938 Peter Gerlack on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCegNhGTqlWjgOqaCsj_7pxw

Please Support School Sucks

Our Amazon Wish List Donate With Bitcoin Or Join the A/V Club Your continued support keeps the show going and growing, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering this message. This subscription also grants you access to the A/V Club, a bonus content section with 200+ hours of exclusive audio and video. If you are a regular consumer of our media, please consider making a monthly commitment by selecting the best option for you...
Join the A/V Club! $6.00/Month
Join the A/V Club! $9.00/Month
Join the A/V Club! $12/Month
June 11, 2015 03:55 PM PDT
With Wes Bertrand and Matt Amberson Discussed Today: We begin going through the ACES questions and scoring ourselves, while discussing our answers and experiences. THE QUESTIONS 1. Did a parent or other adult in the household often or very often… Swear at you, insult you, put you down, or humiliate you? or Act in a way that made you afraid that you might be physically hurt? No___If Yes, enter 1 __ 2. Did a parent or other adult in the household often or very often… Push, grab, slap, or throw something at you? or Ever hit you so hard that you had marks or were injured? No___If Yes, enter 1 __ 3. Did an adult or person at least 5 years older than you ever… Touch or fondle you or have you touch their body in a sexual way? or Attempt or actually have oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse with you? No___If Yes, enter 1 __ 4. Did you often or very often feel that … No one in your family loved you or thought you were important or special? or Your family didn’t look out for each other, feel close to each other, or support each other? No___If Yes, enter 1 __ Look Closer: Complete Liberty Inside Out: Honoring Yourself and Others for Optimal Enrichment - http://amzn.to/1B1CdFo Wes: CompleteLiberty.com/ - http://completeliberty.com/ Complete Liberty Series on trauma - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-209---the-nature-of-trauma-and-nonviolent-change-and-self-compassion_296.html Matt: DeadEasyLife.com - http://deadeasylife.com/ Linking childhood trauma to long-term health and social consequences: What is The ACE Study? - http://www.acestudy.org/ AcesTooHigh.com/ - http://acestoohigh.com/ Happiness Counseling Resources - http://happinesscounseling.com/happiness-resources/ CLP Episode 212 - Adverse Childhood Experiences and reflections on therapeutic solutions - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-212---adverse-childhood-experiences-and-reflections-on-therapeutic-solutions_299.html The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma - http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938 Peter Gerlack on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCegNhGTqlWjgOqaCsj_7pxw

Please Support School Sucks

Our Amazon Wish List Donate With Bitcoin Or Join the A/V Club Your continued support keeps the show going and growing, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering this message. This subscription also grants you access to the A/V Club, a bonus content section with 200+ hours of exclusive audio and video. If you are a regular consumer of our media, please consider making a monthly commitment by selecting the best option for you...
Join the A/V Club! $6.00/Month
Join the A/V Club! $9.00/Month
Join the A/V Club! $12/Month
June 08, 2015 09:02 AM PDT
With Wes Bertrand and Matt Amberson Discussed Today: An introductory discussion about breaking the cycle of trauma inheritance. How do we acknowledge childhood trauma? Are we all being effected? What is the ACES? What do the scores mean? Look Closer: Complete Liberty Inside Out: Honoring Yourself and Others for Optimal Enrichment - http://amzn.to/1B1CdFo Wes: CompleteLiberty.com/ - http://completeliberty.com/ Matt: DeadEasyLife.com - http://deadeasylife.com/ Linking childhood trauma to long-term health and social consequences: What is The ACE Study? - http://www.acestudy.org/ AcesTooHigh.com/ - http://acestoohigh.com/ Happiness Counseling Resources - http://happinesscounseling.com/happiness-resources/ CLP Episode 212 - Adverse Childhood Experiences and reflections on therapeutic solutions - http://completeliberty.com/magazine/read/episode-212---adverse-childhood-experiences-and-reflections-on-therapeutic-solutions_299.html The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma - http://www.amazon.com/The-Body-Keeps-Score-Healing/dp/0670785938 Peter Gerlack on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCegNhGTqlWjgOqaCsj_7pxw
June 01, 2015 01:02 PM PDT
AKA "How To Promote Liberty Without Having to Eat the Government Cheese" Richard Grove and Ernest Hancock join me for roundtable on the challenges, rewards and goals involved with producing liberty-oriented and educational media. In our 2.5 hour discussion, we address the following questions: 1) Why is freedom important? 2) Why do we produce freedom-related content and put it out for free? 3) What do we need to do to get more people who listen passively to support us actively? Look Closer: Ernie's Site: FreedomsPhoenix.com - http://freedomsphoenix.com Richard's Site: TragedyandHope.com - http://www.tragedyandhope.com/
May 26, 2015 05:45 PM PDT
Our third collaboration with Kevin Geary, integrative health coach and founder of RebootedBody.com. Our discussion focuses on my health and fitness progress after following Kevin's advice for eight weeks. Check out our previous discussion here: 344: Solving the Health and Fitness Puzzle (with Kevin Geary) We are also joined by Jason Osborne of Podcastmasters' Liberty Master Class fame. He shares his challenges with Kevin and that leads in to a discussion of a recent RebootedBody.com article called The 6 Pillars of Achieving a Phenomenally Healthy Body and Mind. Look Closer: Rebooted Body - http://rebootedbody.com/ Reboot Your Kids - http://rebootyourkids.com/
May 22, 2015 08:53 AM PDT
Jeff Till (fivehundredyears.org) is a business owner, School Sucks listener, and home-educating parent. He recently added a well-researched, concise and easily sharable entry to his blog called "A Complete Case for Home Education (54 Arguments)." He joins me today to discuss the following arguments: 7. The argument against peer pressure Conformity training leads to students not wanting to be different and to gain the mass approval of others. This is peer pressure, and it can force kids into behaviors they don’t want and bring feelings of rejection, embarrassment and shame. Home education doesn’t teach conformity and lessens the effects of peer pressure because the groups of people they associate with are voluntary. 8. The argument for creating a diverse network Home educated children, through adult relationships, mixed-aged contacts, real work and community interaction are better able to create diverse networks for learning, projects, hobbies and ultimately work. A network of people a child can build can be hugely valuable over time for jobs, opportunities, etc. Conversely, a network of all the people from your town and your exact age is less valuable than the more diverse set a child could build on his or her own. Plus, the network built in school is based on arbitrary groupings of people by age and geography, not in mutual interests or in how value can be created and shared. This is the true value of a network. Networks are not merely having lots of random, dead-end acquaintances, but having relationships with people who can exchange knowledge and value. 9. The argument against drug abuse Children often learn about and experiment with recreational drugs through people at school. Most of the information they are given is from other students who are largely learning on the fly at the same time, hidden away from parental supervision. In home education, parents can better control children’s access to drugs and provide their own education about drug usage according to their values and preferences. School is no guarantee of turning every student into a drug user, and home education is no guarantee of children not finding drugs, but the home educator likely has the favorable situation. And, again, school seems to prompt the use of ADHD type drugs more than anything. That’s not kids abusing drugs, that’s kids being abused with drugs. 10. The argument against poverty and prison Could home education reduce poverty and reduce prison populations? Maybe or maybe not. But we can see how well decades of public school is doing against these goals. Implicit to a school’s stated mission is to prepare children to be productive, intelligent and responsible citizens who can obtain good jobs and contribute. Has schooling, which is universally inflicted on our poor and often at huge expense, curbed poverty or crime in the past 100 years? Or do the poor seem to remain systemically poor and prison populations rising? Home education probably couldn’t perform worse, and home educated children can have many more opportunities to learn responsibility, self-reliance and real-world skills if they wish. The skills they learn can be a set that is custom to their needs, not the canned factory stuff school students must endure. Think of it another way. Consider a framework like Maslow’s hierarchy of needs where first a human must satisfy their basic material needs (food, shelter, safety) before pursuing higher-order emotional and intellectual needs. A poor person, by definition, has fewer basic material needs that are met and should probably be spending their time filling that gap first before chasing higher-order intellectual needs. But school doesn’t allow this. It assumes that if we cram abstract knowledge (e.g., literature, math, history, science) into their heads the gap will disappear magically. It might make more sense to let poorer people learn work skills when they are younger, and once they have rectified their basic needs, they can then pick up the higher-order knowledge they would like to pursue. Let me restate this radical, “bigoted” idea: if we insist that poor children must be forced to learn something, first teach poor people how to not be poor, then, later, maybe teach them about early American history, how to calculate the circumference of a circle, 19th century English literature, sentence diagraming, etc. It’s like there is somebody trapped in a deep whole and what he desperately and immediately needs is instruction on how to build a ladder. But instead of giving him that, we send down a confusing book with a map of Europe, some 500-year-old plays, a periodic table of the elements, and a dodge ball. Maybe this has a bad aesthetic or seems unfair. But is it more fair to delude them and ourselves with a deceitful aesthetic that abstract knowledge is more important than obtaining basic needs? This approach would require discrimination, meaning treating different people differently. Or letting students discriminate about what they want or need to learn. This is antithetical to schooling where everybody gets the same thing regardless of might be of value to them. People are so terrified of discrimination that we’d prefer to maintain sameness at all costs instead of throwing the most needy the lifeline they need. But, I’m not advocating that we force poor people to learn anything. After all, if the boring, dumbing-down, disengaging school experience is deleterious to the flourishing of affluent and middle-class children, it’s probably doubly so for poor children. Why cripple the abilities of lower income children? Why punch them when they are down? Lots of things contribute to poverty and crime, including family, culture, government, laws, luck, individual traits, circumstances, genetics, race, geography and others. But school is in the mix. 11. The argument for vacation Even if we concede that school is just, good and necessary, it’s bizarre that the superintendent gets to dictate when everyone gets to have a vacation. This creates a ridiculous rush for everybody in a state to go on vacation at the same time. It creates scarcity for plane tickets and hotel rooms, raising prices and reducing availability. It creates traffic jams. Beaches and ski slopes are packed. And don’t even try to go to a theme park during these weeks as you’ll pay through the nose for the privilege of waiting in lines for 90 minutes per attraction. Who wants to wait in line? It’s torture, not vacation. The rationed vacation time also creates anxiety. Many families have some panic about making sure they enjoy themselves with the little time they have. The massive disappointment when it rains on vacation is partly ignited because the family knows they can’t extend it due to scheduling, they know it’s going to be months before they are allowed to go again, and it already costs too much. If school systems were a little sensible in this area, they would at least stagger vacations by region to alleviate the artificial rush and make travel more convenient, affordable and enjoyable for the families it supposedly serves. Or at least introduce some flexibility to take time off instead of instilling panic about students missing assignments or taking tests. But they don’t, and hence we show up and take our breaks when they are commanded of us. What terrible nonsense. Home educators decide when they want to go on vacation and can pick times that are smart. They also don’t have to have a rationed amount of time available to them. If three weeks isn’t enough, they can take more. Or take less. Home school families don’t have to pack their family time into a few weeks per year or wait until the school says it is okay to have leisure time. Or feel like they have to “get away” from the pressures and “grind” of the day-to-day. Many homeschool families don’t need a lot of vacation. They live it instead. 12. The final personal argument from experimentation and low risk The final case for home education is the easiest to justify: try it. There’s almost no risk. Take a few months or maybe a year and try it out. Don’t like it? You can always go back to public school. The administrators will welcome your child back with open arms and gladly tell your children to get back in line and shut their mouths. The public school won’t disappear this year or next. Experiment and see what happens. See if your children and yourself are happier. See if you enjoy more family time and the convenience home education provides. See if engagement and curiosity reemerge. Look Closer: Asch Experiment - http://www.simplypsychology.org/asch-conformity.html Soaring Numbers of Children on Powerful Adult Psychiatric Drugs http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-peter-breggin/children-antipsychotics_b_1771152.html Aeon: The play deficit, by Peter Gray - http://aeon.co/magazine/culture/children-today-are-suffering-a-severe-deficit-of-play/ The Decline of Play and the Rise of Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents - http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/3-4-article-gray-decline-of-play.pdf 1 in 13 U.S. Schoolkids Takes Psych Meds: Report - http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/attention-deficit-disorder-adhd-news-50/1-in-13-u-s-schoolkids-takes-psych-meds-report-687125.html?lexp=true&utm_expid=38353063-4.pIV1hUrQR8K_MJ1_OqjLag.1&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3D%26esrc%3Ds%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D11%26cad%3Drja%26uact%3D8%26ved%3D0CFkQFjAK%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fconsumer.healthday.com%252Fkids-health-information-23%252Fattention-deficit-disorder-adhd-news-50%252F1-in-13-u-s-schoolkids-takes-psych-meds-report-687125.html%26ei%3DMd9dVbLJA8TtsAWJiIHQCQ%26usg%3DAFQjCNEhcKd-RKcyqBa6etWHqcZcVumH6Q%26sig2%3DzINVvrcy6a2KOYKXPbCiLw The Underground History of American Education: A Schoolteacher's Intimate Investigation Into The Problem Of Modern Schooling - http://johntaylorgatto.com/underground/
May 19, 2015 03:21 PM PDT
Jeff Till (fivehundredyears.org) is a business owner, School Sucks listener, and home-educating parent. He recently added a well-researched, concise and easily sharable entry to his blog called "A Complete Case for Home Education (54 Arguments)." He joins me today to discuss the following arguments: 1. The argument for happiness and for empathy School makes many if not most kids unhappy. They don’t like most of their school work. They don’t like being told what to do every second of the day. They don’t like having to be part of cliques or getting bullied. They don’t like taking tests. They don’t like getting grades. They hate homework. Getting up early stinks. The bus sucks. So does the food. Sometimes parents hate school too. They hate the schedule it imposes. They hate watching their kids experience the pressure, either of the school work or the social scene. Why is something imposed that makes children unhappy? Especially for 15,000 hours during what should be a person’s happiest years. Would you want to be unhappy? No! Would you purposefully inflict unhappiness on yourself? Hell no! Have a little empathy for the children. Feel what they feel in going to school. Don’t send them somewhere they are near guaranteed to be unhappy. 2. The argument for exposure Some proponents of schooling insist that school exposes children to a broad array of subjects that they wouldn’t be exposed to otherwise. But, school really just teaches five to seven subjects when there are actually thousands of subjects in the world. Even if we were to hone in on something school focuses on like literature, the nation’s schools essentially limit exposure to the same dozen books regardless of a child’s interest, despite there being millions of books in the world. Sure, there is a library at the school, but when do they get to go? And books are just one kind of media, only favored through school’s history because it was the only one available in the pre-modern world when school was invented. An open, free-range education gives children the time to explore any subject they desire and inflicts no one-size-fits-all curriculum. Home educated children not only can be exposed to a wider array of subjects, they can be exposed precisely to the ones they find interesting or useful. 3. The argument for free play Free play is when children, without external restrictions or guidance, design their own activities and modes of play. It can be wonderful in developing independence, creativity, negotiating skills, interpersonal skills, and fun. School kids live under constant direction and surveillance. Their only opportunity for free play during school are the scraps of time given at recess (unsurprisingly, most kids favorite school-time activity). It seems to be a growing trend for parents to further shorten free play by signing their kids up for organized sports and activities after school and on the weekends, further putting them in another system where they wear uniforms and follow the instructions of an adult. Home education provides much more time and opportunity for free play. 4. The argument for history Most history, as it is taught in schools, is political history. Almost every event described is either the work of a President or a war. Even when non-government events are covered, such as the Great Depression or the Million Man March, the story usually hinges on how the government responded. Schools narrow the scope of history to government, and usually only portray a positive view of the student’s own government (e.g., America’s children learn that America is great.) For example, students probably don’t learn the true body counts of American wars or how many people have been incarcerated in its prison system. Real history, though, also includes individual achievement, business, consumption trends, technology, art and media, music, communications, religion, philosophy, scientific discovery, food, and fun. History without a school approach could vastly and wildly open up education to be more inclusive and more expansive, providing everyone with a more complete and valuable knowledge of history. 5. The argument for religion or atheism Home education allows parents to teach their children the fundamentals of how they believe reality and ethics exist in the world. At school, knowledge is to be taught with very little context of how reality or ethics are believed to exist within the world. This is a fairly large omission. Schools presume to teach what exists in the world and how it works, while purposefully ignoring how we understand reality and morality itself. However your sense of aesthetics lie, it should be a right for parents to present their worldview to their children. Some worry that parents will teach misinformation, but rarely give the school the same scrutiny. Would we fault a Hindu wanting to teach their kids about Hindu practices or a Buddhist for teaching their kids how to meditate? The same can be said for teaching atheism. At public school, each day is started with a prayer to the state and God, called the Pledge of Allegiance. While most public schools don’t promote a religious agenda, it is still absolutely taboo to actively suggest God doesn’t exist or that reality is what we view with our senses. As home educators, atheist parents who wish this belief to be a strong part of their children’s education can do so freely, frequently and explicitly. They are allowed to frame knowledge with this view of reality. 6. The argument for family When kids go to school they are separated from their families for seven or eight hours per day, five days per week. Some kids go to a latchkey type program and might be gone for eleven hours per day! Most people know many families who need to race through every day, left with the scraps of time leftover from the school schedule, racing through a morning routine to get to school or the bus stop and having a brief night together of maybe just a few hours. These few hours might be filled with dinner, homework and getting ready for an early bedtime (so they can be sure to get up the next morning.) This leaves families with just the weekend to spend together, which can be filled with organized sports and dad going golfing anyway. I’ve seen families like this. The children place a massive burden on their schedule and they barely get to see them. I wonder why they bothered having children in the first place. School isolates children from their families and can cripple the relationship children have with their parents and siblings. Children who do not go to school can experience richer family interactions more frequently and on a daily basis. And it is good for the parents. Can you imagine anyone on their deathbed wishing they had missed the majority of time they could have spent with their kids when they were growing up? I can’t. RELATED: The argument for sleep, sleeping in and staying up For school children and their families, some stranger – the superintendent – commands that everyone wake up at the same time. And it’s often too early for most people. And because everybody has to get up at the same time, it usually means everybody has to go to bed at basically the same time if one wants a decent chance at getting enough sleep. Why should a total stranger be able to command you, your children, your spouse, and a couple thousand of your neighbors, when to go to bed and when to get up? Plus, it’s not uncommon for kids, especially teenagers, to not get enough sleep. With home education, individuals, not unknown, distant superintendents, get to decide when and how much sleep occurs. Look Closer: Student stress can strain parent-student relationships - http://broadview.sacredsf.org/?p=1302 Common Core Nonfiction Reading Standards Mark The End Of Literature, English Teachers Say http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/common-core-nonfiction-reading-standards_n_2271229.html Aeon: The play deficit, by Peter Gray - http://aeon.co/magazine/culture/children-today-are-suffering-a-severe-deficit-of-play/ The Decline of Play and the Rise of Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents - http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/3-4-article-gray-decline-of-play.pdf A SHORT ANGRY HISTORY OF AMERICAN FORCED SCHOOLING - http://4brevard.com/choice/Public_Education.htm The Underground History of American Education: A Schoolteacher's Intimate Investigation Into The Problem Of Modern Schooling - http://johntaylorgatto.com/underground/
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